Ihde, Stefan

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orcid::0000-0002-2604-3944
  • Ihde, Stefan (5)
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Author's Bibliography

Assessment of Stability of Craniofacial Implants by Resonant Frequency Analysis

Ivanjac, Filip; Konstantinović, Vitomir; Lazić, Vojkan; Đorđević, Igor; Ihde, Stefan

(Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia, 2016)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Ivanjac, Filip
AU  - Konstantinović, Vitomir
AU  - Lazić, Vojkan
AU  - Đorđević, Igor
AU  - Ihde, Stefan
PY  - 2016
UR  - https://smile.stomf.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/2166
AB  - Implant stability is a principal precondition for the success of implant therapy. Extraoral implants (EO) are mainly used for anchoring of maxillofacial epithesis. However, assessment of implant stability is mostly based on principles derived from oral implants. The aim of this study was to investigate clinical stability of EO craniofacial disk implants (single, double, and triple) by resonance frequency analysis at different stages of the bone's healing. Twenty patients with orbital (11), nasal (5), and auricular (4) defects with 50 EO implants placed for epithesis anchorage were included. Implant stability was measured 3 times; after implant placement, at 3 months and at least after 6 months. A significant increase in implant stability values was noted between all of the measurements, except for triple-disk implants between third and sixth months, and screw implants between 0 and third months. Disk implants showed lower implant stability quotient (ISQ) values compared with screw implants. Triple-disk implants showed better stability compared with single and double-disk implants. Based on resonance frequency analysis values, disk implants could be safely loaded when their ISQ values are 38 (single disks), 47 (double disks), and 48 (triple disks). According to resonance frequency analysis, disk implant stability increased over time, which showed good osseointegration and increasing mineralization. Although EO screw implants showed higher ISQ values than disk implants, disk-type implants can be safely loaded even if lower values of stability are measured.
PB  - Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia
T2  - Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
T1  - Assessment of Stability of Craniofacial Implants by Resonant Frequency Analysis
VL  - 27
IS  - 2
SP  - E185
EP  - E189
DO  - 10.1097/SCS.0000000000002443
UR  - conv_3353
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Ivanjac, Filip and Konstantinović, Vitomir and Lazić, Vojkan and Đorđević, Igor and Ihde, Stefan",
year = "2016",
abstract = "Implant stability is a principal precondition for the success of implant therapy. Extraoral implants (EO) are mainly used for anchoring of maxillofacial epithesis. However, assessment of implant stability is mostly based on principles derived from oral implants. The aim of this study was to investigate clinical stability of EO craniofacial disk implants (single, double, and triple) by resonance frequency analysis at different stages of the bone's healing. Twenty patients with orbital (11), nasal (5), and auricular (4) defects with 50 EO implants placed for epithesis anchorage were included. Implant stability was measured 3 times; after implant placement, at 3 months and at least after 6 months. A significant increase in implant stability values was noted between all of the measurements, except for triple-disk implants between third and sixth months, and screw implants between 0 and third months. Disk implants showed lower implant stability quotient (ISQ) values compared with screw implants. Triple-disk implants showed better stability compared with single and double-disk implants. Based on resonance frequency analysis values, disk implants could be safely loaded when their ISQ values are 38 (single disks), 47 (double disks), and 48 (triple disks). According to resonance frequency analysis, disk implant stability increased over time, which showed good osseointegration and increasing mineralization. Although EO screw implants showed higher ISQ values than disk implants, disk-type implants can be safely loaded even if lower values of stability are measured.",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia",
journal = "Journal of Craniofacial Surgery",
title = "Assessment of Stability of Craniofacial Implants by Resonant Frequency Analysis",
volume = "27",
number = "2",
pages = "E185-E189",
doi = "10.1097/SCS.0000000000002443",
url = "conv_3353"
}
Ivanjac, F., Konstantinović, V., Lazić, V., Đorđević, I.,& Ihde, S.. (2016). Assessment of Stability of Craniofacial Implants by Resonant Frequency Analysis. in Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia., 27(2), E185-E189.
https://doi.org/10.1097/SCS.0000000000002443
conv_3353
Ivanjac F, Konstantinović V, Lazić V, Đorđević I, Ihde S. Assessment of Stability of Craniofacial Implants by Resonant Frequency Analysis. in Journal of Craniofacial Surgery. 2016;27(2):E185-E189.
doi:10.1097/SCS.0000000000002443
conv_3353 .
Ivanjac, Filip, Konstantinović, Vitomir, Lazić, Vojkan, Đorđević, Igor, Ihde, Stefan, "Assessment of Stability of Craniofacial Implants by Resonant Frequency Analysis" in Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, 27, no. 2 (2016):E185-E189,
https://doi.org/10.1097/SCS.0000000000002443 .,
conv_3353 .
3
5
3
5

Effects of radiation therapy on craniofacial and dental implants: a review of the literature

Ihde, Stefan; Kopp, Sigmar; Gundlach, K.; Konstantinović, Vitomir

(Mosby-Elsevier, New York, 2009)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Ihde, Stefan
AU  - Kopp, Sigmar
AU  - Gundlach, K.
AU  - Konstantinović, Vitomir
PY  - 2009
UR  - https://smile.stomf.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/1508
AB  - Objectives. The theories of the effects of radiation therapy on craniofacial and dental implants have been challenged by new models. Animal and clinical studies differ on the importance of dose effect and implant location regarding implant survival. Our purpose was to explore the risks of irradiation regarding dose levels, timing of radiation, implant location, and material. Study design. A systematic search of the literature was performed to identify studies reporting animal and human data on the success of implants in irradiated versus nonirradiated bone. Results. Eleven animal studies exploring histomorphometric, biomechanical, and histologic features of implants in irradiated bone were summarized. Sixteen human clinical studies evaluating craniofacial (n = 8) and dental (n = 8) implants in irradiated bone were summarized. No meta-analyses of dental implants in irradiated bone were found. Efficacy studies comparing different implant types in irradiated bone were not found. Conclusion. Studies from both animal subjects and human patients indicate that irradiated bone has a greater risk of implant failure than nonirradiated bone. This increase in risk may be up to 12 times greater; however, studies making these comparisons are of poor to moderate quality, so the magnitude of this difference should be accepted with caution. (Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod 2009; 107: 56-65)
PB  - Mosby-Elsevier, New York
T2  - Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology & Endodontology
T1  - Effects of radiation therapy on craniofacial and dental implants: a review of the literature
VL  - 107
IS  - 1
SP  - 56
EP  - 65
DO  - 10.1016/j.tripleo.2008.06.014
UR  - conv_2813
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Ihde, Stefan and Kopp, Sigmar and Gundlach, K. and Konstantinović, Vitomir",
year = "2009",
abstract = "Objectives. The theories of the effects of radiation therapy on craniofacial and dental implants have been challenged by new models. Animal and clinical studies differ on the importance of dose effect and implant location regarding implant survival. Our purpose was to explore the risks of irradiation regarding dose levels, timing of radiation, implant location, and material. Study design. A systematic search of the literature was performed to identify studies reporting animal and human data on the success of implants in irradiated versus nonirradiated bone. Results. Eleven animal studies exploring histomorphometric, biomechanical, and histologic features of implants in irradiated bone were summarized. Sixteen human clinical studies evaluating craniofacial (n = 8) and dental (n = 8) implants in irradiated bone were summarized. No meta-analyses of dental implants in irradiated bone were found. Efficacy studies comparing different implant types in irradiated bone were not found. Conclusion. Studies from both animal subjects and human patients indicate that irradiated bone has a greater risk of implant failure than nonirradiated bone. This increase in risk may be up to 12 times greater; however, studies making these comparisons are of poor to moderate quality, so the magnitude of this difference should be accepted with caution. (Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod 2009; 107: 56-65)",
publisher = "Mosby-Elsevier, New York",
journal = "Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology & Endodontology",
title = "Effects of radiation therapy on craniofacial and dental implants: a review of the literature",
volume = "107",
number = "1",
pages = "56-65",
doi = "10.1016/j.tripleo.2008.06.014",
url = "conv_2813"
}
Ihde, S., Kopp, S., Gundlach, K.,& Konstantinović, V.. (2009). Effects of radiation therapy on craniofacial and dental implants: a review of the literature. in Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology & Endodontology
Mosby-Elsevier, New York., 107(1), 56-65.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tripleo.2008.06.014
conv_2813
Ihde S, Kopp S, Gundlach K, Konstantinović V. Effects of radiation therapy on craniofacial and dental implants: a review of the literature. in Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology & Endodontology. 2009;107(1):56-65.
doi:10.1016/j.tripleo.2008.06.014
conv_2813 .
Ihde, Stefan, Kopp, Sigmar, Gundlach, K., Konstantinović, Vitomir, "Effects of radiation therapy on craniofacial and dental implants: a review of the literature" in Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology & Endodontology, 107, no. 1 (2009):56-65,
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tripleo.2008.06.014 .,
conv_2813 .
129
97
121

The use of finite element analysis to model bone-implant contact with basal implants

Ihde, Stefan; Goldmann, Tomas; Himmlova, Lucie; Aleksić, Zoran

(Mosby-Elsevier, New York, 2008)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Ihde, Stefan
AU  - Goldmann, Tomas
AU  - Himmlova, Lucie
AU  - Aleksić, Zoran
PY  - 2008
UR  - https://smile.stomf.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/1433
AB  - Objective. The purpose of this study was to develop a model that accurately represents the interface between bone and basal implants throughout the healing process. Study Design. The model was applied to the biological scenario of changing load distribution in a basal implant system over time. We did this through finite element analysis (FEA, or finite element method [FEM]), using multiple models with changing bone-implant contact definitions, which reflected the dynamic nature of the interface throughout the bony healing process. Results. In the simple models, peak von Mises stresses decreased as the bone-implant-contact definition was changed from extremely soft contact (i.e., immature bone during early loading) to hard contact (i.e., mature bone). In upgraded models, which more closely approximate the biological scenario with basal dental implant, peak von Mises stresses decreased at the implant interface; however, they increased at the bone interface as a harder contact definition was modeled. Further, we found a shift in peak stress location within the implants during different contact definitions (i.e., different stages of bony healing). In the case of hard contact, the peak stress occurs above the contact surface, whereas in soft contact, the stress peak occurs in the upper part of the contact area between bone and the vertical shaft of the implant. Only in the extreme soft contact definitions were the peak stresses found near the base plate of the implant. Conclusion. Future FEM studies evaluating the functional role of dental implants should consider a similar model that takes into account bone tissue adaptations over time.
PB  - Mosby-Elsevier, New York
T2  - Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology & Endodontology
T1  - The use of finite element analysis to model bone-implant contact with basal implants
VL  - 106
IS  - 1
SP  - 39
EP  - 48
DO  - 10.1016/j.tripleo.2007.12.005
UR  - conv_2782
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Ihde, Stefan and Goldmann, Tomas and Himmlova, Lucie and Aleksić, Zoran",
year = "2008",
abstract = "Objective. The purpose of this study was to develop a model that accurately represents the interface between bone and basal implants throughout the healing process. Study Design. The model was applied to the biological scenario of changing load distribution in a basal implant system over time. We did this through finite element analysis (FEA, or finite element method [FEM]), using multiple models with changing bone-implant contact definitions, which reflected the dynamic nature of the interface throughout the bony healing process. Results. In the simple models, peak von Mises stresses decreased as the bone-implant-contact definition was changed from extremely soft contact (i.e., immature bone during early loading) to hard contact (i.e., mature bone). In upgraded models, which more closely approximate the biological scenario with basal dental implant, peak von Mises stresses decreased at the implant interface; however, they increased at the bone interface as a harder contact definition was modeled. Further, we found a shift in peak stress location within the implants during different contact definitions (i.e., different stages of bony healing). In the case of hard contact, the peak stress occurs above the contact surface, whereas in soft contact, the stress peak occurs in the upper part of the contact area between bone and the vertical shaft of the implant. Only in the extreme soft contact definitions were the peak stresses found near the base plate of the implant. Conclusion. Future FEM studies evaluating the functional role of dental implants should consider a similar model that takes into account bone tissue adaptations over time.",
publisher = "Mosby-Elsevier, New York",
journal = "Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology & Endodontology",
title = "The use of finite element analysis to model bone-implant contact with basal implants",
volume = "106",
number = "1",
pages = "39-48",
doi = "10.1016/j.tripleo.2007.12.005",
url = "conv_2782"
}
Ihde, S., Goldmann, T., Himmlova, L.,& Aleksić, Z.. (2008). The use of finite element analysis to model bone-implant contact with basal implants. in Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology & Endodontology
Mosby-Elsevier, New York., 106(1), 39-48.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tripleo.2007.12.005
conv_2782
Ihde S, Goldmann T, Himmlova L, Aleksić Z. The use of finite element analysis to model bone-implant contact with basal implants. in Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology & Endodontology. 2008;106(1):39-48.
doi:10.1016/j.tripleo.2007.12.005
conv_2782 .
Ihde, Stefan, Goldmann, Tomas, Himmlova, Lucie, Aleksić, Zoran, "The use of finite element analysis to model bone-implant contact with basal implants" in Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology & Endodontology, 106, no. 1 (2008):39-48,
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tripleo.2007.12.005 .,
conv_2782 .
3
20
13
16

Implementation of contact definitions calculated by fea to describe the healing process of basal implants

Ihde, Stefan; Goldmann, Tomas; Himmlova, Lucie; Aleksić, Zoran; Kuzelka, Jiri

(Palacky Univ, Medical Fac, Olomouc, 2008)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Ihde, Stefan
AU  - Goldmann, Tomas
AU  - Himmlova, Lucie
AU  - Aleksić, Zoran
AU  - Kuzelka, Jiri
PY  - 2008
UR  - https://smile.stomf.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/1425
AB  - Aims: Bone structure around basal implants shows a dual healing mode: direct contact areas manifest primary osteonal remodeling, in the void osteotomy-induced spaces, the repair begins with woven bone formation. This woven bone is later converted into osteonal bone. The purpose of this study was to develop a model to accurately represent the interface between bone and basal implant throughout the healing process. The model was applied to the biological scenario of changing load distribution in a basal implant system over time. Methods: Computations were made through finite element analysis using multiple models with changing bone-implant contact definitions which reflected the dynamic nature of the interface throughout the bony healing process. Five stages of bony healing were calculated taking into account the changes in mineral content of bone in the vicinity of the load transmitting implant surfaces. Results: As the bony integration of basal implants proceeds during healing, peak stresses within the metal structure shift geographically. While bony repair may still weaken osteonal bone, woven bone has already matured. This leads to changes in the load distribution between and within the direct contact areas, and bone areas which make later contact with implant. Conclusions: This study shows that basal implants undergo an intrinsic shift of maximum stress regions during osseointegration. Fatigue testing methods in the case of basal implants must therefore take into account this gradual shift from early healing phase until full osseointegration is achieved.
PB  - Palacky Univ, Medical Fac, Olomouc
T2  - Biomedical Papers - Olomouc
T1  - Implementation of contact definitions calculated by fea to describe the healing process of basal implants
VL  - 152
IS  - 1
SP  - 169
EP  - 173
DO  - 10.5507/bp.2008.028
UR  - conv_2815
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Ihde, Stefan and Goldmann, Tomas and Himmlova, Lucie and Aleksić, Zoran and Kuzelka, Jiri",
year = "2008",
abstract = "Aims: Bone structure around basal implants shows a dual healing mode: direct contact areas manifest primary osteonal remodeling, in the void osteotomy-induced spaces, the repair begins with woven bone formation. This woven bone is later converted into osteonal bone. The purpose of this study was to develop a model to accurately represent the interface between bone and basal implant throughout the healing process. The model was applied to the biological scenario of changing load distribution in a basal implant system over time. Methods: Computations were made through finite element analysis using multiple models with changing bone-implant contact definitions which reflected the dynamic nature of the interface throughout the bony healing process. Five stages of bony healing were calculated taking into account the changes in mineral content of bone in the vicinity of the load transmitting implant surfaces. Results: As the bony integration of basal implants proceeds during healing, peak stresses within the metal structure shift geographically. While bony repair may still weaken osteonal bone, woven bone has already matured. This leads to changes in the load distribution between and within the direct contact areas, and bone areas which make later contact with implant. Conclusions: This study shows that basal implants undergo an intrinsic shift of maximum stress regions during osseointegration. Fatigue testing methods in the case of basal implants must therefore take into account this gradual shift from early healing phase until full osseointegration is achieved.",
publisher = "Palacky Univ, Medical Fac, Olomouc",
journal = "Biomedical Papers - Olomouc",
title = "Implementation of contact definitions calculated by fea to describe the healing process of basal implants",
volume = "152",
number = "1",
pages = "169-173",
doi = "10.5507/bp.2008.028",
url = "conv_2815"
}
Ihde, S., Goldmann, T., Himmlova, L., Aleksić, Z.,& Kuzelka, J.. (2008). Implementation of contact definitions calculated by fea to describe the healing process of basal implants. in Biomedical Papers - Olomouc
Palacky Univ, Medical Fac, Olomouc., 152(1), 169-173.
https://doi.org/10.5507/bp.2008.028
conv_2815
Ihde S, Goldmann T, Himmlova L, Aleksić Z, Kuzelka J. Implementation of contact definitions calculated by fea to describe the healing process of basal implants. in Biomedical Papers - Olomouc. 2008;152(1):169-173.
doi:10.5507/bp.2008.028
conv_2815 .
Ihde, Stefan, Goldmann, Tomas, Himmlova, Lucie, Aleksić, Zoran, Kuzelka, Jiri, "Implementation of contact definitions calculated by fea to describe the healing process of basal implants" in Biomedical Papers - Olomouc, 152, no. 1 (2008):169-173,
https://doi.org/10.5507/bp.2008.028 .,
conv_2815 .
3
6
4
5

The therapeutic use of botulinum toxin in cervical and maxillofacial conditions: an evidence-based review

Ihde, Stefan; Konstantinović, Vitomir

(Mosby-Elsevier, New York, 2007)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Ihde, Stefan
AU  - Konstantinović, Vitomir
PY  - 2007
UR  - https://smile.stomf.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/1327
AB  - Introduction. The role of botulinum toxin as a therapeutic agent for several conditions is expanding. We sought to determine if botulinum toxin is safe and effective in treating patients with cervical dystonia and maxillofacial conditions. Our purpose was to establish a safety and efficacy profile to determine whether or not this treatment may be used prophylactically in patients undergoing dental implant therapy. Methods. We performed a systematic search of the literature to identify randomized clinical trials evaluating patients treated with botulinum toxin as an adjunct to dental implant therapy, maxillofacial conditions including temporomandibular disorders (TMD), and cervical dystonia. Results. Four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) met our search criteria in the area of cervical dystonia and chronic facial pain. No RCTs were identified evaluating dental implant therapy. Patients with cervical dystonia exhibited significant improvements in baseline functional, pain, and global assessments compared to placebo. Adverse events were mild and transient with numbers needed to harm (NNH) ranging from 12 to 17. Patients with chronic facial pain improved significantly from baseline in terms of pain compared to placebo. Rates of adverse events were less than 1%. Conclusion. Botulinum toxin appears relatively safe and effective in treating cervical dystonia and chronic facial pain associated with masticatory hyperactivity. No literature exists evaluating its use in dental implantology. Randomized clinical trials are warranted to determine its safety and efficacy in dental implantology and other maxillofacial conditions such as bruxism.
PB  - Mosby-Elsevier, New York
T2  - Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology & Endodontology
T1  - The therapeutic use of botulinum toxin in cervical and maxillofacial conditions: an evidence-based review
VL  - 104
IS  - 2
SP  - E1
EP  - E11
DO  - 10.1016/j.tripleo.2007.02.004
UR  - conv_2748
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Ihde, Stefan and Konstantinović, Vitomir",
year = "2007",
abstract = "Introduction. The role of botulinum toxin as a therapeutic agent for several conditions is expanding. We sought to determine if botulinum toxin is safe and effective in treating patients with cervical dystonia and maxillofacial conditions. Our purpose was to establish a safety and efficacy profile to determine whether or not this treatment may be used prophylactically in patients undergoing dental implant therapy. Methods. We performed a systematic search of the literature to identify randomized clinical trials evaluating patients treated with botulinum toxin as an adjunct to dental implant therapy, maxillofacial conditions including temporomandibular disorders (TMD), and cervical dystonia. Results. Four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) met our search criteria in the area of cervical dystonia and chronic facial pain. No RCTs were identified evaluating dental implant therapy. Patients with cervical dystonia exhibited significant improvements in baseline functional, pain, and global assessments compared to placebo. Adverse events were mild and transient with numbers needed to harm (NNH) ranging from 12 to 17. Patients with chronic facial pain improved significantly from baseline in terms of pain compared to placebo. Rates of adverse events were less than 1%. Conclusion. Botulinum toxin appears relatively safe and effective in treating cervical dystonia and chronic facial pain associated with masticatory hyperactivity. No literature exists evaluating its use in dental implantology. Randomized clinical trials are warranted to determine its safety and efficacy in dental implantology and other maxillofacial conditions such as bruxism.",
publisher = "Mosby-Elsevier, New York",
journal = "Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology & Endodontology",
title = "The therapeutic use of botulinum toxin in cervical and maxillofacial conditions: an evidence-based review",
volume = "104",
number = "2",
pages = "E1-E11",
doi = "10.1016/j.tripleo.2007.02.004",
url = "conv_2748"
}
Ihde, S.,& Konstantinović, V.. (2007). The therapeutic use of botulinum toxin in cervical and maxillofacial conditions: an evidence-based review. in Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology & Endodontology
Mosby-Elsevier, New York., 104(2), E1-E11.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tripleo.2007.02.004
conv_2748
Ihde S, Konstantinović V. The therapeutic use of botulinum toxin in cervical and maxillofacial conditions: an evidence-based review. in Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology & Endodontology. 2007;104(2):E1-E11.
doi:10.1016/j.tripleo.2007.02.004
conv_2748 .
Ihde, Stefan, Konstantinović, Vitomir, "The therapeutic use of botulinum toxin in cervical and maxillofacial conditions: an evidence-based review" in Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology & Endodontology, 104, no. 2 (2007):E1-E11,
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tripleo.2007.02.004 .,
conv_2748 .
49
37
43