Multiscale Methods and Their Applicatios in Nanomedicine

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Multiscale Methods and Their Applicatios in Nanomedicine (en)
Методе моделирања на више скала са применама у биомедицини (sr)
Metode modeliranja na više skala sa primenama u biomedicini (sr_RS)
Authors

Publications

Trauma of the Frontal Region Is Influenced by the Volume of Frontal Sinuses. A Finite Element Study

Pajić, Srbislav; Antić, Svetlana; Vukicević, Arso M.; Đorđević, Nenad; Jovicić, Gordana; Savić, Živorad; Saveljić, Igor; Janović, Aleksa; Pešić, Zoran; Đurić, Marija; Filipović, Nenad

(Frontiers Media Sa, Lausanne, 2017)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Pajić, Srbislav
AU  - Antić, Svetlana
AU  - Vukicević, Arso M.
AU  - Đorđević, Nenad
AU  - Jovicić, Gordana
AU  - Savić, Živorad
AU  - Saveljić, Igor
AU  - Janović, Aleksa
AU  - Pešić, Zoran
AU  - Đurić, Marija
AU  - Filipović, Nenad
PY  - 2017
UR  - https://smile.stomf.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/2215
AB  - Anatomy of frontal sinuses varies individually, from differences in volume and shape to a rare case when the sinuses are absent. However, there are scarce data related to influence of these variations on impact generated fracture pattern. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyse the influence of frontal sinus volume on the stress distribution and fracture pattern in the frontal region. The study included four representative Finite Element models of the skull. Reference model was built on the basis of computed tomography scans of a human head with normally developed frontal sinuses. By modifying the reference model, three additional models were generated: a model without sinuses, with hypoplasic, and with hyperplasic sinuses. A 7.7 kN force was applied perpendicularly to the forehead of each model, in order to simulate a frontal impact. The results demonstrated that the distribution of impact stress in frontal region depends on the frontal sinus volume. The anterior sinus wall showed the highest fragility in case with hyperplasic sinuses, whereas posterior wall/inner plate showed more fragility in cases with hypoplasic and undeveloped sinuses. Well-developed frontal sinusesmight, through absorption of the impact energy by anterior wall, protect the posterior wall and intracranial contents.
PB  - Frontiers Media Sa, Lausanne
T2  - Frontiers in Physiology
T1  - Trauma of the Frontal Region Is Influenced by the Volume of Frontal Sinuses. A Finite Element Study
VL  - 8
DO  - 10.3389/fphys.2017.00493
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Pajić, Srbislav and Antić, Svetlana and Vukicević, Arso M. and Đorđević, Nenad and Jovicić, Gordana and Savić, Živorad and Saveljić, Igor and Janović, Aleksa and Pešić, Zoran and Đurić, Marija and Filipović, Nenad",
year = "2017",
abstract = "Anatomy of frontal sinuses varies individually, from differences in volume and shape to a rare case when the sinuses are absent. However, there are scarce data related to influence of these variations on impact generated fracture pattern. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyse the influence of frontal sinus volume on the stress distribution and fracture pattern in the frontal region. The study included four representative Finite Element models of the skull. Reference model was built on the basis of computed tomography scans of a human head with normally developed frontal sinuses. By modifying the reference model, three additional models were generated: a model without sinuses, with hypoplasic, and with hyperplasic sinuses. A 7.7 kN force was applied perpendicularly to the forehead of each model, in order to simulate a frontal impact. The results demonstrated that the distribution of impact stress in frontal region depends on the frontal sinus volume. The anterior sinus wall showed the highest fragility in case with hyperplasic sinuses, whereas posterior wall/inner plate showed more fragility in cases with hypoplasic and undeveloped sinuses. Well-developed frontal sinusesmight, through absorption of the impact energy by anterior wall, protect the posterior wall and intracranial contents.",
publisher = "Frontiers Media Sa, Lausanne",
journal = "Frontiers in Physiology",
title = "Trauma of the Frontal Region Is Influenced by the Volume of Frontal Sinuses. A Finite Element Study",
volume = "8",
doi = "10.3389/fphys.2017.00493"
}
Pajić, S., Antić, S., Vukicević, A. M., Đorđević, N., Jovicić, G., Savić, Ž., Saveljić, I., Janović, A., Pešić, Z., Đurić, M.,& Filipović, N.. (2017). Trauma of the Frontal Region Is Influenced by the Volume of Frontal Sinuses. A Finite Element Study. in Frontiers in Physiology
Frontiers Media Sa, Lausanne., 8.
https://doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2017.00493
Pajić S, Antić S, Vukicević AM, Đorđević N, Jovicić G, Savić Ž, Saveljić I, Janović A, Pešić Z, Đurić M, Filipović N. Trauma of the Frontal Region Is Influenced by the Volume of Frontal Sinuses. A Finite Element Study. in Frontiers in Physiology. 2017;8.
doi:10.3389/fphys.2017.00493 .
Pajić, Srbislav, Antić, Svetlana, Vukicević, Arso M., Đorđević, Nenad, Jovicić, Gordana, Savić, Živorad, Saveljić, Igor, Janović, Aleksa, Pešić, Zoran, Đurić, Marija, Filipović, Nenad, "Trauma of the Frontal Region Is Influenced by the Volume of Frontal Sinuses. A Finite Element Study" in Frontiers in Physiology, 8 (2017),
https://doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2017.00493 . .
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Occlusal load distribution through the cortical and trabecular bone of the human mid-facial skeleton in natural dentition: A three-dimensional finite element study

Janović, Aleksa; Saveljić, Igor; Vukicević, Arso M.; Nikolić, Dalibor; Rakočević, Zoran; Jovicić, Gordana; Filipović, Nenad; Đurić, Marija

(Elsevier Gmbh, Munich, 2015)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Janović, Aleksa
AU  - Saveljić, Igor
AU  - Vukicević, Arso M.
AU  - Nikolić, Dalibor
AU  - Rakočević, Zoran
AU  - Jovicić, Gordana
AU  - Filipović, Nenad
AU  - Đurić, Marija
PY  - 2015
UR  - https://smile.stomf.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/2050
AB  - Understanding of the occlusal load distribution through the mid-facial skeleton in natural dentition is essential because alterations in magnitude and/or direction of occlusal forces may cause remarkable changes in cortical and trabecular bone structure. Previous analyses by strain gauge technique, photoelastic and, more recently, finite element (FE) methods provided no direct evidence for occlusal load distribution through the cortical and trabecular bone compartments individually. Therefore, we developed an improved three-dimensional FE model of the human skull in order to clarify the distribution of occlusal forces through the cortical and trabecular bone during habitual masticatory activities. Particular focus was placed on the load transfer through the anterior and posterior maxilla. The results were presented in von Mises stress (VMS) and the maximum principal stress, and compared to the reported FE and strain gauge data. Our qualitative stress analysis indicates that occlusal forces distribute through the mid-facial skeleton along five vertical and two horizontal buttresses. We demonstrated that cortical bone has a priority in the transfer of occlusal load in the anterior maxilla, whereas both cortical and trabecular bone in the posterior maxilla are equally involved in performing this task Observed site dependence of the occlusal load distribution may help clinicians in creating strategies for implantology and orthodontic treatments. Additionally, the magnitude of VMS in our model was significantly lower in comparison to previous FE models composed only of cortical bone. This finding suggests that both cortical and trabecular bone should be modeled whenever stress will be quantitatively analyzed.
PB  - Elsevier Gmbh, Munich
T2  - Annals of Anatomy - Anatomischer Anzeiger
T1  - Occlusal load distribution through the cortical and trabecular bone of the human mid-facial skeleton in natural dentition: A three-dimensional finite element study
VL  - 197
SP  - 16
EP  - 23
DO  - 10.1016/j.aanat.2014.09.002
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Janović, Aleksa and Saveljić, Igor and Vukicević, Arso M. and Nikolić, Dalibor and Rakočević, Zoran and Jovicić, Gordana and Filipović, Nenad and Đurić, Marija",
year = "2015",
abstract = "Understanding of the occlusal load distribution through the mid-facial skeleton in natural dentition is essential because alterations in magnitude and/or direction of occlusal forces may cause remarkable changes in cortical and trabecular bone structure. Previous analyses by strain gauge technique, photoelastic and, more recently, finite element (FE) methods provided no direct evidence for occlusal load distribution through the cortical and trabecular bone compartments individually. Therefore, we developed an improved three-dimensional FE model of the human skull in order to clarify the distribution of occlusal forces through the cortical and trabecular bone during habitual masticatory activities. Particular focus was placed on the load transfer through the anterior and posterior maxilla. The results were presented in von Mises stress (VMS) and the maximum principal stress, and compared to the reported FE and strain gauge data. Our qualitative stress analysis indicates that occlusal forces distribute through the mid-facial skeleton along five vertical and two horizontal buttresses. We demonstrated that cortical bone has a priority in the transfer of occlusal load in the anterior maxilla, whereas both cortical and trabecular bone in the posterior maxilla are equally involved in performing this task Observed site dependence of the occlusal load distribution may help clinicians in creating strategies for implantology and orthodontic treatments. Additionally, the magnitude of VMS in our model was significantly lower in comparison to previous FE models composed only of cortical bone. This finding suggests that both cortical and trabecular bone should be modeled whenever stress will be quantitatively analyzed.",
publisher = "Elsevier Gmbh, Munich",
journal = "Annals of Anatomy - Anatomischer Anzeiger",
title = "Occlusal load distribution through the cortical and trabecular bone of the human mid-facial skeleton in natural dentition: A three-dimensional finite element study",
volume = "197",
pages = "16-23",
doi = "10.1016/j.aanat.2014.09.002"
}
Janović, A., Saveljić, I., Vukicević, A. M., Nikolić, D., Rakočević, Z., Jovicić, G., Filipović, N.,& Đurić, M.. (2015). Occlusal load distribution through the cortical and trabecular bone of the human mid-facial skeleton in natural dentition: A three-dimensional finite element study. in Annals of Anatomy - Anatomischer Anzeiger
Elsevier Gmbh, Munich., 197, 16-23.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aanat.2014.09.002
Janović A, Saveljić I, Vukicević AM, Nikolić D, Rakočević Z, Jovicić G, Filipović N, Đurić M. Occlusal load distribution through the cortical and trabecular bone of the human mid-facial skeleton in natural dentition: A three-dimensional finite element study. in Annals of Anatomy - Anatomischer Anzeiger. 2015;197:16-23.
doi:10.1016/j.aanat.2014.09.002 .
Janović, Aleksa, Saveljić, Igor, Vukicević, Arso M., Nikolić, Dalibor, Rakočević, Zoran, Jovicić, Gordana, Filipović, Nenad, Đurić, Marija, "Occlusal load distribution through the cortical and trabecular bone of the human mid-facial skeleton in natural dentition: A three-dimensional finite element study" in Annals of Anatomy - Anatomischer Anzeiger, 197 (2015):16-23,
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aanat.2014.09.002 . .
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Real-time thermographic analysis of low-density bone during implant placement: a randomized parallel-group clinical study comparing lateral condensation with bone drilling surgical technique

Marković, Aleksa; Mišić, Tijana; Mancić, Dragan; Jovanović, Igor; Šćepanović, Miodrag; Jezdić, Zoran

(Wiley, Hoboken, 2014)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Marković, Aleksa
AU  - Mišić, Tijana
AU  - Mancić, Dragan
AU  - Jovanović, Igor
AU  - Šćepanović, Miodrag
AU  - Jezdić, Zoran
PY  - 2014
UR  - https://smile.stomf.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/1877
AB  - Objectives: To compare the effect of two surgical techniques, lateral condensation and bone drilling, on changes in temperature of the adjacent low-density bone during implant placement into posterior maxilla and to investigate the influence of the host factors - age, gender, region of implantation, bone density, and thickness of the cortical bone at the recipient sites. Material and methods: Local bone temperature was measured thermographically during implant placement into posterior maxilla following lateral bone condensing (test group) or bone drilling (controls). The main study outcomes were baseline bone temperature prior to implantation and maximum bone temperature recorded during implantation. Early implant success was evaluated after 6 months of healing. Results: A total of 40 implants were randomly allocated to test and control groups and placed into maxillary premolar and/or molar region of 18 participants of both genders and average age of 51.74 years. All recorded bone temperatures were below the threshold for thermal necrosis. Although both groups showed significant increase in bone temperature during implant placement procedure (P  lt = 0.0005), it was significantly higher for bone condensing compared with drilling (P  lt = 0.0005; 3.79 +/- 1.54 degrees C; 1.91 +/- 0.70 degrees C respectively). No host factor was singled out as a significant predictor of bone temperature changes, although trend of higher increase was observed in young patients, regardless of gender, during implant placement procedure into maxillary first premolar region with bone density type 3 and cortical layer thicker than 1 mm. Early implant success rate after 6 months follow-up was 100%. Conclusion: Although both surgical techniques, bone condensing and bone drilling, can be considered safe regarding their thermal effect on the bone of posterior maxilla, bone drilling is associated with fewer local bone heating during implantation. Host factors do not affect the bone thermal changes significantly.
PB  - Wiley, Hoboken
T2  - Clinical Oral Implants Research
T1  - Real-time thermographic analysis of low-density bone during implant placement: a randomized parallel-group clinical study comparing lateral condensation with bone drilling surgical technique
VL  - 25
IS  - 8
SP  - 910
EP  - 918
DO  - 10.1111/clr.12191
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Marković, Aleksa and Mišić, Tijana and Mancić, Dragan and Jovanović, Igor and Šćepanović, Miodrag and Jezdić, Zoran",
year = "2014",
abstract = "Objectives: To compare the effect of two surgical techniques, lateral condensation and bone drilling, on changes in temperature of the adjacent low-density bone during implant placement into posterior maxilla and to investigate the influence of the host factors - age, gender, region of implantation, bone density, and thickness of the cortical bone at the recipient sites. Material and methods: Local bone temperature was measured thermographically during implant placement into posterior maxilla following lateral bone condensing (test group) or bone drilling (controls). The main study outcomes were baseline bone temperature prior to implantation and maximum bone temperature recorded during implantation. Early implant success was evaluated after 6 months of healing. Results: A total of 40 implants were randomly allocated to test and control groups and placed into maxillary premolar and/or molar region of 18 participants of both genders and average age of 51.74 years. All recorded bone temperatures were below the threshold for thermal necrosis. Although both groups showed significant increase in bone temperature during implant placement procedure (P  lt = 0.0005), it was significantly higher for bone condensing compared with drilling (P  lt = 0.0005; 3.79 +/- 1.54 degrees C; 1.91 +/- 0.70 degrees C respectively). No host factor was singled out as a significant predictor of bone temperature changes, although trend of higher increase was observed in young patients, regardless of gender, during implant placement procedure into maxillary first premolar region with bone density type 3 and cortical layer thicker than 1 mm. Early implant success rate after 6 months follow-up was 100%. Conclusion: Although both surgical techniques, bone condensing and bone drilling, can be considered safe regarding their thermal effect on the bone of posterior maxilla, bone drilling is associated with fewer local bone heating during implantation. Host factors do not affect the bone thermal changes significantly.",
publisher = "Wiley, Hoboken",
journal = "Clinical Oral Implants Research",
title = "Real-time thermographic analysis of low-density bone during implant placement: a randomized parallel-group clinical study comparing lateral condensation with bone drilling surgical technique",
volume = "25",
number = "8",
pages = "910-918",
doi = "10.1111/clr.12191"
}
Marković, A., Mišić, T., Mancić, D., Jovanović, I., Šćepanović, M.,& Jezdić, Z.. (2014). Real-time thermographic analysis of low-density bone during implant placement: a randomized parallel-group clinical study comparing lateral condensation with bone drilling surgical technique. in Clinical Oral Implants Research
Wiley, Hoboken., 25(8), 910-918.
https://doi.org/10.1111/clr.12191
Marković A, Mišić T, Mancić D, Jovanović I, Šćepanović M, Jezdić Z. Real-time thermographic analysis of low-density bone during implant placement: a randomized parallel-group clinical study comparing lateral condensation with bone drilling surgical technique. in Clinical Oral Implants Research. 2014;25(8):910-918.
doi:10.1111/clr.12191 .
Marković, Aleksa, Mišić, Tijana, Mancić, Dragan, Jovanović, Igor, Šćepanović, Miodrag, Jezdić, Zoran, "Real-time thermographic analysis of low-density bone during implant placement: a randomized parallel-group clinical study comparing lateral condensation with bone drilling surgical technique" in Clinical Oral Implants Research, 25, no. 8 (2014):910-918,
https://doi.org/10.1111/clr.12191 . .
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Evaluation of Primary Stability of Self-Tapping and Non-Self-Tapping Dental Implants. A 12-Week Clinical Study

Marković, Aleksa; Luis Calvo-Guirado, Jose; Lazić, Zoran; Gomez-Moreno, Gerardo; Ćalasan, Dejan; Guardia, Javier; Čolić, Snježana; Aguilar-Salvatierra, Antonio; Gačić, Bojan; Delgado-Ruiz, Rafael; Janjić, Bojan; Mišić, Tijana

(Wiley, Hoboken, 2013)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Marković, Aleksa
AU  - Luis Calvo-Guirado, Jose
AU  - Lazić, Zoran
AU  - Gomez-Moreno, Gerardo
AU  - Ćalasan, Dejan
AU  - Guardia, Javier
AU  - Čolić, Snježana
AU  - Aguilar-Salvatierra, Antonio
AU  - Gačić, Bojan
AU  - Delgado-Ruiz, Rafael
AU  - Janjić, Bojan
AU  - Mišić, Tijana
PY  - 2013
UR  - https://smile.stomf.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/1816
AB  - Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between surgical techniques and implant macro-design (self-tapping/non-self-tapping) for the optimization of implant stability in the low-density bone present in the posterior maxilla using resonance frequency analysis (RFA). Materials and Methods: A total of 102 implants were studied. Fifty-six self-tapping BlueSkyBredent (R) (Bredent GmbH &, Senden, Germany) and 56 non-self-tapping Standard Plus Straumann (R) (Institut Straumann AG (R), Waldenburg, Switzerland) were placed in the posterior segment of the maxilla. Implants of both types were placed in sites prepared with either lateral bone-condensing or with bone-drilling techniques. Implant stability measurements were performed using RFA immediately after implant placement and weekly during a 12-week follow-up period. Results: Both types of implants placed after bone condensing achieved significantly higher stability immediately after surgery, as well as during the entire 12-week observation period compared with those placed following bone drilling. After bone condensation, there were no significant differences in primary stability or in implant stability after the first week between both implant types. From 2 to 12 postoperative weeks, significantly higher stability was shown by self-tapping implants. After bone drilling, self-tapping implants achieved significantly higher stability than non-self-tapping implants during the entire follow-up period. Conclusions: The outcomes of the present study indicate that bone drilling is not an effective technique for improving implant stability and, following this technique, the use of self-tapping implants is highly recommended. Implant stability optimization in the soft bone can be achieved by lateral bone-condensing technique, regardless of implant macro-design.
PB  - Wiley, Hoboken
T2  - Clinical Implant Dentistry & Related Research
T1  - Evaluation of Primary Stability of Self-Tapping and Non-Self-Tapping Dental Implants. A 12-Week Clinical Study
VL  - 15
IS  - 3
SP  - 341
EP  - 349
DO  - 10.1111/j.1708-8208.2011.00415.x
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Marković, Aleksa and Luis Calvo-Guirado, Jose and Lazić, Zoran and Gomez-Moreno, Gerardo and Ćalasan, Dejan and Guardia, Javier and Čolić, Snježana and Aguilar-Salvatierra, Antonio and Gačić, Bojan and Delgado-Ruiz, Rafael and Janjić, Bojan and Mišić, Tijana",
year = "2013",
abstract = "Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between surgical techniques and implant macro-design (self-tapping/non-self-tapping) for the optimization of implant stability in the low-density bone present in the posterior maxilla using resonance frequency analysis (RFA). Materials and Methods: A total of 102 implants were studied. Fifty-six self-tapping BlueSkyBredent (R) (Bredent GmbH &, Senden, Germany) and 56 non-self-tapping Standard Plus Straumann (R) (Institut Straumann AG (R), Waldenburg, Switzerland) were placed in the posterior segment of the maxilla. Implants of both types were placed in sites prepared with either lateral bone-condensing or with bone-drilling techniques. Implant stability measurements were performed using RFA immediately after implant placement and weekly during a 12-week follow-up period. Results: Both types of implants placed after bone condensing achieved significantly higher stability immediately after surgery, as well as during the entire 12-week observation period compared with those placed following bone drilling. After bone condensation, there were no significant differences in primary stability or in implant stability after the first week between both implant types. From 2 to 12 postoperative weeks, significantly higher stability was shown by self-tapping implants. After bone drilling, self-tapping implants achieved significantly higher stability than non-self-tapping implants during the entire follow-up period. Conclusions: The outcomes of the present study indicate that bone drilling is not an effective technique for improving implant stability and, following this technique, the use of self-tapping implants is highly recommended. Implant stability optimization in the soft bone can be achieved by lateral bone-condensing technique, regardless of implant macro-design.",
publisher = "Wiley, Hoboken",
journal = "Clinical Implant Dentistry & Related Research",
title = "Evaluation of Primary Stability of Self-Tapping and Non-Self-Tapping Dental Implants. A 12-Week Clinical Study",
volume = "15",
number = "3",
pages = "341-349",
doi = "10.1111/j.1708-8208.2011.00415.x"
}
Marković, A., Luis Calvo-Guirado, J., Lazić, Z., Gomez-Moreno, G., Ćalasan, D., Guardia, J., Čolić, S., Aguilar-Salvatierra, A., Gačić, B., Delgado-Ruiz, R., Janjić, B.,& Mišić, T.. (2013). Evaluation of Primary Stability of Self-Tapping and Non-Self-Tapping Dental Implants. A 12-Week Clinical Study. in Clinical Implant Dentistry & Related Research
Wiley, Hoboken., 15(3), 341-349.
https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1708-8208.2011.00415.x
Marković A, Luis Calvo-Guirado J, Lazić Z, Gomez-Moreno G, Ćalasan D, Guardia J, Čolić S, Aguilar-Salvatierra A, Gačić B, Delgado-Ruiz R, Janjić B, Mišić T. Evaluation of Primary Stability of Self-Tapping and Non-Self-Tapping Dental Implants. A 12-Week Clinical Study. in Clinical Implant Dentistry & Related Research. 2013;15(3):341-349.
doi:10.1111/j.1708-8208.2011.00415.x .
Marković, Aleksa, Luis Calvo-Guirado, Jose, Lazić, Zoran, Gomez-Moreno, Gerardo, Ćalasan, Dejan, Guardia, Javier, Čolić, Snježana, Aguilar-Salvatierra, Antonio, Gačić, Bojan, Delgado-Ruiz, Rafael, Janjić, Bojan, Mišić, Tijana, "Evaluation of Primary Stability of Self-Tapping and Non-Self-Tapping Dental Implants. A 12-Week Clinical Study" in Clinical Implant Dentistry & Related Research, 15, no. 3 (2013):341-349,
https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1708-8208.2011.00415.x . .
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